Enhanced respiratory muscular function in normal adults after lessons in proprioceptive musculoskeletal education without exercises

Chest 1992 Aug;102(2):486-90.

Austin JH, Ausubel P.

Department of Radiology, College of Physicians and Surgeons, Columbia University, New York 10032.

 

BRIEF SUMMARY

This study evaluated the effect of Alexander Technique lessons on respiratory function in healthy people. Ten volunteers received at least 20 one-to-one Alexander lessons from teachers trained by the American Society for the Alexander Technique (which is affiliated with STAT). Another ten volunteers acted as controls and received no intervention. 

In the Alexander Technique group significant changes were observed between the beginning of the study and the assessment (after approximately 7 months) in four out of seven different measurements of respiratory function. In contrast, there were no significant changes in the control group. These findings suggest that Alexander Technique lessons may lead to some improvement in respiratory muscular strength and endurance. However, further research is needed to confirm the results of this small study and to find out whether Alexander Technique lessons lead to improved respiratory function in people with breathing difficulties, such as people with asthma.

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Copyright © Chest. 
Reproduced by permission of the publisher.

Breathing

I was recommended the Alexander Technique for my problems with back pain. It took a few lessons before I noticed a subtle but very noticeable difference. Mainly in confidence; I no longer 'feared' my back going, as I had structures in place to deal with it. I've been doing it now for 17 years, seeing my teacher once a month. I am sure that, had I not found the Technique, I'd have gone down the road of further back operations, and would probably be in a wheelchair by now. Can't rate it too highly.

Carol Hedges - Author
See the benefits of Alexander Technique