Neuromechanical interference of posture on movement: evidence from Alexander Technique teachers rising from a chair

Journal of Neurophysiology 2014;112:719–29

Cacciatore TW, Mian OS, Peters A, Day BL

This study suggests that the smoother patterns of movement and better balance observed in individuals who have undergone extensive training in the Alexander Technique (compared with untrained healthy adults) may be the result of the changes in postural tone that accompany such training.

 

Read the paper here: http://www.physiology.org/doi/abs/10.1152/jn.00617.2013

At about the age of 45, I began to experience severe pain in both of my knees. I was told I had damaged the cartilage, initially caused by the use of a kicking strap on a sailing dinghy, and made worse by many years of beagling, and to stop beagling or risk ending up in a wheelchair. A few years later a friend suggested the Alexander Technique. At first I was very sceptical, but had also reached the stage where I was ready to try virtually any means to solve the problem. A few weeks after my first lesson, I had gone out beagling, but only walking.

Chris Walsh

See the benefits of Alexander Technique