Research Directory

Journal of Body & Movement Therapies (2016). In Press Hamel, KA, Ross C, Schultz B, O'Neill M, Anderson DI.   BRIEF SUMMARY This is the second paper to come out of a study comparing the movement...
BMC Musculoskeletal Disorders 2016;17:372. Preece SJ, Jones RK, Brown CA, Cacciatore TW, Jones AKP. BRIEF SUMMARY Background: Knee osteoarthritis is a common condition affecting more than one in ten...
Annals of Internal Medicine 2015;163:653-62 MacPherson H, Tilbrook H, Richmond S, Woodman J, Ballard K, Atkin K, Bland M, Eldred J, Essex H, Hewitt C, Hopton A, Keding A, Lansdown H, Parrott S,...
Journal of Body & Movement Therapies 2015;19:473–481  O'Neil M,  Anderson D, Allen D, Ross C, Hamel K     BRIEF SUMMARY Balance in movement (dynamic stability) is often impaired in older people....
Clinical Rehabilitation 2015;29:244–60 Gleeson M, Sherrington C, Lo S, Keay L.   BRIEF SUMMARY In this trial involving people aged over 50 years with impaired vision, 120 participants were...

It is a challenge to try to summarize the experience [of the Alexander Technique], as I find it (and it finds me) being the constant change, not there to be grasped. The most measureable is the sharpening of all the senses. My violinist ears react to the most subtle nuances in the sound and the experience is that of all the senses 'working' on the sound (and the means that are producing it), when I play. This has made possible the greater awareness in the moment present. [A musician] is only able to do something about the sound (the moment) that is being produced, nothing past nor nothing to come. With all that, of course, comes freedom. The breathing, the freedom of movement, the freshness, the spontaneity, the creativity, the joy of it all. Through the Alexander training I am becoming more whole: as a person, as an artist.

Agnieszka Opiola, Independent Violinist, Glasgow
See the benefits of Alexander Technique